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https://mattersoftesting.blog.gov.uk/ban-on-tyres-over-10-years-old-on-minibuses-buses-and-coaches/

Ban on tyres over 10 years old on minibuses, buses and coaches

Posted by: , Posted on: - Categories: Changes to the MOT test, News and updates

In September 2012, a coach returning from a music festival crashed after a 19 year old tyre fitted to its front axle blew out, causing the death of three people on the coach.

Taking action

In July 2020, following an industry-wide consultation, The Department for Transport (DFT) announced a ban on tyres over 10 years old on any axle of minibuses with single wheels fitted or on the front axle of any lorry, bus or coach. As this legislation takes effect on 1 February 2021, I wanted to let you know how this will affect you.

 What it means for you

The legislation applies mainly to heavy commercial vehicles – HGVs and PSVs - which we test at Authorised Testing Facilities (ATFs).

But it also applies to some vehicles that fall into the MOT scheme – so vehicles with more than 8 passenger seats that are not used commercially – so are not tested as PSVs. These vehicles are tested in MOT classes 4 or 5, so the test will change for them.

This means failures for tyres over 10 years old on the front axle of any vehicles with 9 or more passenger seats, and any single wheels of a minibus (9-16 passenger seats). These vehicles will also fail if they do not display a legible date code on in scope tyres.

So, when testing you will need to check that each tyre displays a date of manufacture or re-treading date on the appropriate vehicle.

This will not add significant additional test time as the tyres are already checked for condition.

What happens next

We will publish updates to the MOT inspection manual which will be user tested before going live in January, before the new legislation comes into force.  This will set out the detail what you need to look for and what will fail during an MOT test.

A difficult year

I recognise the challenges you have faced this year in conducting tests throughout the lockdown and the subsequent restrictions across the country, you’ve worked hard to help deal with the backlog of vehicles that needed to be tested following the 6-month exemption.

In October alone, MOT garages were testing 20,000 extra vehicles per day and your hard work is ensuring the safety of vehicles on our roads.

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50 comments

  1. Comment by K s Atwal posted on

    Hello after reading all the comments I am begging the DVSA please don’t sit on the fence and cut out the gray areas out/ make it a law any tyre over 10 years old on any road vehicles is a failure there are other areas the DVSA should also look at to make it black or white so all mot testers are singing from the same hymn sheet thank you KS ATWAL

  2. Comment by Bryan Brown posted on

    I appreciate that tyres perish with age and new tyres seem to be perishing quicker these days. Motorcycles, horse-boxes and caravans that stand for the winter are more prone to this too. The problem is that been in the tyre game for many years some tyres have already been on the shelf for 2, 3 and even 4 years before they are fitted reducing the length of time they can be on a vehicle.

  3. Comment by Frank Gordon posted on

    I do a number of vintage buses as a Class 5, do these come into the category?

    • Replies to Frank Gordon>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Vehicles aged 40 years or older that are no longer produced and have been maintained in their original condition, are exempt from the tyre age requirement. This exemption does not apply if the vehicle is used for a commercial purpose.

  4. Comment by Roy Griffiths posted on

    Should also be extended to cars.

  5. Comment by Nicholas Edwards posted on

    This should be extended to include motorcycles too. They tend to be used infrequently, often stored badly & quite often ridden with insufficient pressure in them. At 10 years old, the rubber is often hard & cracked within the tread area which is only an advisory!

  6. Comment by Steve mansell posted on

    I think this is a great idea I also think its about time the tyre depth should be re assessed to 1.6mm across the whole width of a tyre on class 4. .

  7. Comment by Paul Wilson posted on

    I think this should be the same for cars the amount of tyres I see that are over ten years old and heavily perished it shouldn't matter on a certain class of vehicles tyres are the main safety to keep you on the roads.

  8. Comment by Free0029 posted on

    Why not make it across the whole Mot test and that way we know the exact standards that should apply, some cars still have original tyres ( over ten years ) very low mileage but they are old and when assessing condition, its cracks side & some perished walls.Advisory

  9. Comment by Steve pearl posted on

    I assume this includes a private hgv motorhome, front tyres only?

  10. Comment by Clive posted on

    How about camper vans ?

    • Replies to Clive>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      This is not being applied to camper vans at the moment unless they have the types of axles explained in the article.

  11. Comment by Dick posted on

    Hi
    Mini bus with twin wheels on the rear?

    • Replies to Dick>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      It is recorded as a minor defect which would still result in a pass.

  12. Comment by Robert posted on

    what about HGV trailer as i went to mot with trailer and one off the tyres
    was 10 years old. the tester was going to report me to dvsa . he passed the trailer but with advised .

    Most of the trailer today have single wheels ?

    what about trailer with steering axles ?

    • Replies to Robert>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      On your first point, this will be a minor defect. It will be a minor defect for not having a date code. The information only applies to front steered axles.

  13. Comment by Paul Derrick posted on

    How does it apply to historic vehicle exccempt historic vehicle such as 1954 green.goddess that has former. Military style type not available for general sale??

    • Replies to Paul Derrick>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Vehicles aged 40 years or older that are no longer produced and have been maintained in their original condition, are exempt from the tyre age requirement. This exemption does not apply if the vehicle is used for a commercial purpose.

  14. Comment by ian rhodes posted on

    how will the new tyre law effect large motorhomes over 3,500 gvw that are tested as class4 vehicles.

  15. Comment by Tim Bartlett posted on

    And the guidance on where to find the tyres age is ????
    P.S. is that Date of manufacture or date of fitment?

    • Replies to Tim Bartlett>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Guidance will be published in the MOT inspection manual. It refers to the date of manufacture, details of which will also be in the manual.

  16. Comment by Simon R posted on

    "These vehicles will also fail if they do not display a legible date code on in scope tyres"

    Can someone please explain what "in scope tyres" are please?
    Also never having had to look for tyre date stamps what do they look like and do they have to be marked on both sides?
    What if the sidewall has been damaged ie brushed up against the kerb, is this now an automatic fail on above mentioned vehicles?
    Thanks

    • Replies to Simon R>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      'In scope tyres' refers to any axle of minibuses with single wheels fitted or on the front axle of any lorry, bus or coach.
      Regarding tyre date stamping, guidance and photo will be in the MOT inspection manual. Codes are only required to be stamped on one side, again this will be detailed in the manual. Information about sidewall damage will also be included.

  17. Comment by geoff posted on

  18. Comment by Iain Geddes posted on

    What about larger motor caravans? Not just import RVs, say a 15 seat minibus is converted to a four berth camper, is it outside of scope by virtue of not having more than eight travelling seats? Does this also apply to classic and historic vehicles?

    • Replies to Iain Geddes>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      If it is a camper and no longer a minibus it is not included.

  19. Comment by David S posted on

    (Non tester)
    Will advisories be issued for tyres aged over 9 years but less than 10 years at the time of test?

    • Replies to David S>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      The presenter should be advised if any tyres fitted are between 9 and 10 years of age.

      • Replies to Julia (DVSA)>

        Comment by David posted on

  20. Comment by Jason posted on

    So when does the date start on a retreaded casing?
    When the casing was manufactured or re-treaded ??? Bearing in mind that the tyre will have already done its life's work and aged before it is remanufactured!!

    • Replies to Jason>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Remoulded/retreaded tyres may have two date codes. One being the original code and the other being the date of retreading. In this case the most recent date code must be used.

  21. Comment by Lewis guy. Mot tester posted on

    Is there likely to a similar situation for cars and class 4 and 7 vans. As it shouldn’t be one rule for one and another rule for another, and also are more likely to see more of the things that as happened in past accidents.

    • Replies to Lewis guy. Mot tester>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      The Government has taken the decision only to include the types of vehicle specified at this time.

  22. Comment by Ian rhodes posted on

    Will the new tyre law apply to large motor homes tested as class4 even though they are sometimes hgv based vehicles

    • Replies to Ian rhodes>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      If they are tested as a HGV yes. If it’s a class 4 then no.

  23. Comment by martin sykes posted on

    what about some sort of similar or any check on trailers and caravans especially

    • Replies to martin sykes>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      The legislation has not included these vehicles following studies and consultations. Only heavy trailers subject to plating and testing regulations are included - light trailers and caravans are not included.

  24. Comment by Peter Doe posted on

    Does this include historic hgvs

    • Replies to Peter Doe>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Vehicles aged 40 years or older that are no longer produced and have been maintained in their original condition, are exempt from the tyre age requirement. This exemption does not apply if the vehicle is used for a commercial purpose.

  25. Comment by P GOODSPEED posted on

    HOPE IT GOES OVER TO CARS TOO! ALL VEHICLE TYRES UNDER TEN YRS OLD CAN ONLY BE A GOOD THING SURELY!!

    • Replies to P GOODSPEED>

      Comment by Cliff posted on

      Totally agree, this would be a very welcome move adding to safety.

    • Replies to P GOODSPEED>

      Comment by Chris posted on

      I find that most tyres fail for cracking, with visible ply showing long before the tyre is anywhere near 10 years old.

    • Replies to P GOODSPEED>

      Comment by Gurbinder Singh posted on

      Should cover tyres of any road vehicle capable of travelling at 40mph.
      GS

  26. Comment by Philip Litlewood posted on

    You state in covers commercially operated hgv's, does it mean a privately owned horse box on a hgv chassis's is except ?
    Phil littlewood
    Mot tester

    • Replies to Philip Litlewood>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      No this includes all commercial vehicles, so even a horse box used for private use will need to have tyres that are younger than 10 years.

      • Replies to Julia (DVSA)>

        Comment by Simon Ott posted on

        All commercial vehicles, Julia? So does that include my Astra van?

        • Replies to Simon Ott>

          Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

          No, this refers to HGVs, greater than 3500kg GVW tested as HGVs.

      • Replies to Julia (DVSA)>

        Comment by K Clarke posted on

        Typical DVSA wording as usual, where nothing is clear. Commercially operated makes it sound like private vehicles should be exempt.

        • Replies to K Clarke>

          Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

          No. The article mentions that the legislation 'applies mainly to heavy commercial vehicles'. So those for private use will need to have tyres that are younger than 10 years.