https://mattersoftesting.blog.gov.uk/what-connected-mot-equipment-means-for-you/

What connected MOT equipment means for you

A roller brake tester

As you know we’re introducing connected technology to the MOT, starting with connected roller brake testers from October this year.

We’ve wanted to do this for a while, but the technology hasn’t been ready.  That’s changed recently and we’re now able to take vehicle testing forward, saving you time and improving accuracy.

More accurate testing

Modern testing equipment now captures lots of information about a vehicle in real time. But we still ask you to manually key that information into the MOT computer.

This is prone to errors and adds time to the test. Connecting equipment directly to the MOT system will reduce errors and save time. In the long term, this will help to reduce or eliminate the number of incorrectly entered results, as well as stopping incorrectly entered vehicle identification numbers (VINs) and mileage.

Headlight alignment is also still a major source of errors in the test. The modern connected headlight aligner will assess the headlamp aim for the tester and send the result straight to the MOT system.

Using this technology will not only make testing more accurate, it will also help reduce fraud. This is because an actual roller brake test will have to have taken place for a result to be recorded.

At the moment, a roller brake test result can theoretically be entered without any evidence of a roller brake test having taken place. Connected equipment will make it more difficult for dishonest testers.

Saving you time

One big advantage of connected MOT equipment will be the time it saves MOT garages. Instead of a tester carrying out a test, noting down the result, then entering it manually, it will be recorded instantly.

The time saved per test won’t be massive – we think it should save you a couple of minutes per test - but when you do hundreds of tests a year, the savings will add up.

Future proofing

Vehicle technology is changing. Systems such as Advanced Driver-Assistance System (ADAS) and lane departure are becoming the norm.  And as we slowly adopt hybrid and electric vehicles and, longer term, autonomous vehicles, the MOT test needs to keep pace.

That means we need to use the latest technology that can match the most up to date vehicles. That will involve creating a fully integrated, digital MOT service fit for the 21st century. Introducing MOT equipment that can connect and directly report to the MOT testing service is an important part of that process.

Working with the manufacturers

We’ve been trialling connected equipment with manufacturers for over a year. This includes:

  • roller brake testers
  • emissions analysers
  • decelerometers
  • headlight testers

We’re also experimenting with connecting to vehicles during the MOT via the European on-Board Diagnostic port (EOBD).  We’ve successfully extracted the VIN, the mileage and, in some cases, fault codes from a high percentage of vehicles.

As well as this, we’re discussing adding number plate recognition cameras (ANPR) into the test bay. Having a photo of every vehicle will help with registering the vehicle for test and reduce fraud.

A view from the ground

The Test Centre in Deptford has been involved with the trial. Ian Wills, the authorised examiner designated manager (AEDM) for the site said,

As the busiest MOT Station in the UK, we need equipment that is reliable and efficient. We’ve been working closely with Boston Garage Equipment to trial brake testers and emissions testers in our three test centres.

Using this equipment gives us more accurate results, direct onto the MTS System making it quicker for our testers and customers alike; both critical factors in our business success.

We are always seeking ways to reduce workloads on our testers and with the equipment now being connected, it removes any ambiguity, ensuring safer vehicles for our customers.

Also, at The Test Centre Training School, we strive to be market leaders and always demonstrate best practice. Connected equipment is the beginning of the future for the motor industry and it’s great to see DVSA understanding the needs, to make life easy in the 21st century.

The Garage Equipment Association (GEA) is on board

The GEA is fully engaged with us and now has 16 connected roller brake testers from 2 manufactures on the approved equipment list. Lots more will be following soon, so garages will be able to benefit from a wide range of connected equipment just as they have done so far with non-connected items.

Lots of equipment already in use in garages today can be connected. So it may simply be that the software in the equipment needs updating, with no need to replace the whole device.

The GEA will list software versions that meet connected standard and equipment manufactures and installers will be able to provide a simple upgrade.

Making the changes

We don’t expect every garage to rush out and start purchasing connected equipment. So, we’re adopting a phased introduction.

From 1 October this year any new applications to operate a test station must install a connected roller brake tester. Also from this date, any replacement roller brake testers installed in already approved sites will need to be connected.

We’ll introduce more equipment types as they become approved by the GEA, using the same approach to the brake tester mentioned above.

As always if you have any relevant comments or questions please get in touch with us.

 

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142 comments

  1. Comment by Ronnie posted on

    Who has to pay for the ANPR camera s ?

    Reply
    • Replies to Ronnie>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Ronnie
      As with all MOT equipment the cost is borne by the testing station. We aim to work with the GEA to help us and them to offer a wide range of equipment at varying costs.

      Reply
  2. Comment by Small Independant Garage - Scotland posted on

    I agree that we have to keep equipment up to date but have to also be realistic in to investment levels in today's Motor Trade.

    I recently installed a brand new ATL test bay at costs of over 30k.
    With staffing costs / Calibration / Overheads etc there is not anything left for further large investment.

    In build up City's there can be multiple testng stations driving down the costs some as little as £15 which is mad ! , More needs to be done to make the motor trade a more sustainable industry. (Fixed Price Testing)

    A labourer on a building site can earn much more than a skilled Mechanic/ Tester who has been to college and trained for 4 years & worked in the trade for years.

    It won't be long before no one will be interested working in the trade as there is nothing in it anymore , Which will affect a lot of jobs / small businesses just trying to make a living.

    Finally , Surely all the background checks / training and DVSA visits must be enough to put trust in most testing facilities , And those handfull who are not complying with latest standards/ issuing fraudulent tests must be highlighted !

    I think the investment should really be with the DVSA More staffing at local depot's and regular checks to suspect sites , Rather than have everyone invest in to data that can be accessed remotely that will be flagged by a computer and by the time something can be done about it the vehicle's will be long gone.

    Reply
  3. Comment by Hooters posted on

    Hi Julia,
    As the connected equipment is gradually rolled-out, I'm sure many of the VTS's may find the (not insignificant) extra costs too onerous to bear given that the DVSA refuse to assist in the fixing of the test fees.
    Do they not consider then that there may be less test stations available as some will leave the scheme, and end up with a situation similar to that in the 'Moving On' blog (20 February 2019)?
    Here, many of the commercial vehicle operators complain bitterly about being unable to get their vehicles readily tested and/or having to travel many miles for a'slot'.

    Reply
    • Replies to Hooters>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi there
      DVSA has no evidence to suggest test stations will close. In fact, every month we authorise lots of new MOT stations.

      Reply
  4. Comment by David posted on

    Why are so many people crying?

    Thing's are changing within every trade. With change comes the need to update things.
    I work in a garage that's got the original equipment from 15 year's ago. The ramp leaks, the jack doesn't roll properly, roller remote is missing. Then I look at other testing stations and I'm in awe of the equipment.

    Roll on bringing in ATL's everywhere f it were to happen. Folk need to start upgrading aging old garages. The one I work at being one of them!!!

    Reply
    • Replies to David>

      Comment by mark posted on

      i worked in our garage for 30 years and still has original equipment and it all works fine as it did before i arrived no need for change

      Reply
    • Replies to David>

      Comment by bert posted on

      then it sounds to me your garage isn't keeping the equipment in good working order which I would have thought they needed to, and that would count for insurance reasons and health and safety reasons

      Reply
  5. Comment by Gary posted on

    Would it not be fair to wait till more manufacturers are onboard before making people choose from a limited amount of equipment manufacturers who can inflate prices knowing there is no competition?

    Reply
    • Replies to Gary>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Gary
      DVSA and the GEA are working with multiple equipment manufacturers so that we can offer the same choice the market is used to today. We are confident that more manufactures will be approved very soon, offering you a wide spectrum of choice with the cost and design of these machines.

      Reply
  6. Comment by Martin posted on

    DVSA have been told repeatedly that a MIL lamp does not necessarily mean there is a fault with the emissions.
    The information you are working with is out of date and incorrect.
    Also you state that we have the option to use advisories to inform the customer that items on the vehicle are minimum standard.
    We are now testing to a lower safety standard than we were five years ago and having to use incorrect terms to fail items otherwise it will result in an unsafe vehicle being given a pass certificate.
    Take notice of what the people in the front line are telling you instead of those in ivory towers.

    Reply
    • Replies to Martin>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Martin
      If people in the front line include the trade user group, VTS council members, the Department for Transport, vehicle and equipment manufactures and the GEA, then yes we do take note of what we are being told. Connecting to vehicles is exactly what we need to do to allow us to fully understand the condition of the vehicles during MOT going forward, be it the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL), or other warning lights.
      We will continue to work with you and all other parties listed to grow this area of work so that the MOT adapts to the changing demands of ever more complex vehicles.
      This blog is a small window into the work we do to bring about these changes to the MOT and I can assure you they are not taken lightly.

      Reply
  7. Comment by Steve posted on

    I can't help thinking that although laudable in intention, the proposed changes penalise the small businesses within the scheme as any equipment purchase has to be carefully considered, taking into account lifespan and financial return. Having seemingly 'moving goalposts' many will be reluctant to commit to this 'brave new world', bigger players have more financial security and their market share is unlikely to decline, in fact the opposite is all too likely.

    Reply
    • Replies to Steve>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Steve
      Any garage will only need to replace an item as described above if it breaks down or a new garage is opening. Many garages will possibly be able to upgrade their existing equipment by upgrading the software and the physical machine will not need replacing. This will be significantly cheaper and we encourage you to speak to your equipment supplier for more details.

      Reply
  8. Comment by Robert shotton posted on

    hi this is the second time i have asked this question. i am a sole trader. if i go into partnerships with someone in October will my vts be classified as a new vts and therefore need new equipment.????

    Reply
  9. Comment by Richard posted on

    Its all OK investing in new technology - when it works, and when its kept up to date, but I was a VOSA vehicle examiner when we first tried to connect EGR to the then computer system and after vast sums of money was wasted it was abandoned ! - would be much better spending and 'spare' funds on reintroducing the periodic VOSA tester refresher training course (because the current system does not work - and I dare you to carry out a survey of all existing testers! ) and employing more vehicle examiners to enforce, educate and encourage the MOT scheme.

    Reply
  10. Comment by Robert Shotton posted on

    I am a sole trader. If I take on a partner after October will I need to buy new machines

    Reply
    • Replies to Robert Shotton>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Robert
      Where there is continuity with the AE we will not enforce upgraded equipment at this stage. New applications does include new AEs at existing sites so you will be fine if you're taking someone else on.

      Reply
  11. Comment by Gary Adcock posted on

    Will the DVSA ever consider running a NCT system (Ireland) where one body runs and carrys out all the vehicle testing?
    Would this make more exacting standards of testing, all using the same equipment etc?

    Reply
    • Replies to Gary Adcock>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Gary
      No there are no plans to changes the current model for the national MOT scheme.

      Reply
  12. Comment by Andrew posted on

    We have over the years seen the Mot test change to include new technologies and advances in automotive engineering .But I think the core of the test has been dumbed down so much .Its now very easy to get through an Mot when it comes to steering suspension brakes and tyres . Just think if you got vehicle in for a test and it was the perfect storm. Four nearly bald tyres, brakes linings are on the limit and binding slightly brake pipes are corroded hand brake just about works, pedal is a bit spongey .Steering joints have got play in them steering racks a bit worn, suspension bushes perished its got some corrosion here and there but not in any serious places ,the nearside mirrors smashed the windscreen cracked the list can go on .Would you get in the car and drive it ? They keep going on about testing standards but concentrate on the wrong things.I tested a vehicle not long ago it flew through the main test items, passed the emmisions test .But whats this the engine Mil lamp is on Fail I said .Turns out that the Engine Ecu monitors the aircon gas pressure ,so effectively the car failed because the aircon didnt work.Would the EOBD connected equipment know that this fault is nothing to do with a testable item? Why bother with connected equipment its just giving us more and more bits of tech to keep running and we all know technology is absolutely 100% reliable right . I would just like to see a more focused test on the core elements of the vehicle .Get more DVSA boots on the ground if you want to root out the bad testers . Dont try and dress it up as an opportunity for us to increase our productivity and efficiency .Please fix the test fee at full price .

    Reply
    • Replies to Andrew>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Andrew
      The MOT test is there to check that vehicles meet a minimum standard, any items that are close to the limit can be advised on, therefore informing the motorist that their vehicle may soon not meet those standards and will require repairing. As mentioned in the blog we are starting to explore the possibility to use EOBD during the test to extract data from the vehicle, its hard to know at this stage whether the scenario you describe would be detected on a basic EOBD scan. MIL lights generally indicate a fault with the emissions control system.

      Reply
    • Replies to Andrew>

      Comment by Ronnie posted on

      It's not the core of the TEST its the caliber of testers allowed once apon a time being a tester used to mean something anyone with a box of spanners could say they were a mechanic qualified or not being a tester ment you had to be in my humble opinion

      Reply
      • Replies to Ronnie>

        Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

        Hi Ronnie
        MOT testers have to meet eligibility rules, take a tester qualification course and carry out a demonstration test. They also have to carry out training and assessment every year. With this in mind, the skills required to become an MOT tester have increased not deceased.

        Reply
  13. Comment by Steve posted on

    The GEA is "on board" , I would imagine they are given the opportunity to sell vast amounts of new kit when perfectly serviceable tried and tested equipment suddenly becomes obsolete. As for the endorsement of the Deptford business used for the evaluation, their tie-in with Boston probably means the cost was minimal and the back up and maintenance impeccable. As the "busiest MOT Station in the UK" it is surely in their interest to promote something which has the capability to reduce the competition. and are therefore conflicted. Surely using a small MOT and repair garage with a single test bay would be more representative.

    Reply
    • Replies to Steve>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Steve
      The GEA does not sell equipment but approves it to make sure it meets the standard to be used in MOT test stations. The test centre Deptford may not be representative of all test stations but the tests they do certainly are, and they have seen the benefits in using connected equipment, much like any other garage will.

      Reply
    • Replies to Steve>

      Comment by Robert posted on

      I think this is a great idea. For all those who do a "thorough MOT" have nothing to worry about. All those who moan have something to hide!! Lets stop the "Dodgy MOTS".

      Reply
      • Replies to Robert>

        Comment by mark posted on

        I do a thorough MOT and have nothing to hide but i dont agree with all these changes its called freedom of speech after 35 years too many changes at once

        Reply
  14. Comment by Michael Carruthers posted on

    Hello All
    I have no problem with the new tec equipment but I do have a problem that you may not know about if you have more than four security cameras fitted to your premises this will attract a increase in your council tax rates being charged by your local council having just had a visit from my local council rates department and warned also what happens with GDPR as this will link the car with the owner ?

    Reply
    • Replies to Michael Carruthers>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Michael
      There isn’t an issue with GDPR. The camera would only be linked to the DVSA data base and not DVLA so we have no one of knowing who owns the vehicle. We cannot comment on the tax implications as this is not our area of work.

      Reply
  15. Comment by Derek posted on

    When is it expected that the emissions test will be connected directly?
    Air quality is an important thing for us to help with. Having consistent accurate and honest testing to the manufacture's plate limit at full fuelling would help.

    Reply
    • Replies to Derek>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Derek
      Emissions analysers will be added in the near future once they have been approved.

      Reply
  16. Comment by John posted on

    Have you come up with a way for us to test 4 wheel drive vehicles with electric hand brakes yet? Seems to be a problem you're ignoring

    Reply
    • Replies to John>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi John
      Digital decelerometers are on the market now and can be purchased and used in the MOT. We are trialling a connected version that will be approved soon.

      Reply
      • Replies to Julia (DVSA)>

        Comment by Rob posted on

        I think John is asking if a new procedure has been thought out for testing 4x4 vehicles with electronic hand brakes as at the moment some EPBs are disabled when the vehicles are moving so can't be tested using a decelerometer.

        Reply
    • Replies to John>

      Comment by bert posted on

      there are loads of 4x4 vehicles with electric hand brakes that are tested in the rolling road, information is given at the start of the mot with the VSI

      Reply
  17. Comment by Ronnie posted on

    Is this like comp 1 where we had to pay to get out machines checked for compatability for the card reader only for VOSA to shelve that 💡 idea and not get refunded ?

    Reply
    • Replies to Ronnie>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Ronnie
      You will need to speak to the equipment manufacturer to see if your current equipment can be upgraded so that it can be connected. There may well be a cost associated with the upgrade if you chose to have it. However as mention in the blog and previous comments you only have to upgrade if your current machine breaks, you are applying to open a new garage or a change in entity at an existing site.

      Reply
  18. Comment by Guy posted on

    Hi Julia (Dvsa)

    Your answers appear like Alexa is on the other side, or a well versed.

    It would be good to hear Dvsa insisting that manufacturers who have already installed equipment that can be retro upgraded for connectivity will have to do it for free at calibration as part of their oligopoly status with Dvsa. The Calibration companies are fleecing stations... fact. Pro rata 180.00 per hour.
    Are Dvsa working on introducing a chemical analysis emission tester for diesel that will go further than testing the opacity of diesel. You are a standards agency, The levels of chemicals emitted by diesels needs testing. I’m surprised testers have not got together to Perdue the likes of VW for ingestion if harmful fumes.

    Reply
    • Replies to Guy>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Guy
      DVSA does not have the authority to mandate the pricing structures of equipment suppliers or maintainers, we are working with the GEA to ensure lots of equipment already in use can have a software upgrade rather than replacing the whole machine, which will be significantly cheaper.
      At the time of writing this there are no plans to introduce any different forms of Diesel testing into the MOT.

      Reply
  19. Comment by Kelly posted on

    Will this apply to Motorcycle Testing Stations or just for cars at this time?

    Reply
    • Replies to Kelly>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Kelly
      This just to class 4.5 and 7 at this time but we are talking to manufactures of Class 1 and 2 brake testers.

      Reply
  20. Comment by ian posted on

    its a good idea if the technology fails it it fails no if or buts
    headlamp aim is always a contentious one

    Reply
  21. Comment by Jim posted on

    Hi i cant wait for connected equiptment and cameras.
    Anything that helps me do
    My job as a tester is a good thing

    Reply
  22. Comment by Chris posted on

    I'm all for moving forward with the times and yes equipment needs updating to keep up with these modern vehicles. But its not going to stop the small number of test stations that do 'BENT' mot's. They will just use another vehicle to get the required test results.

    Reply
    • Replies to Chris>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Chris
      This phased approach of connected equipment and other measures we use will slowly make it harder to carry out fraudulent tests and easier for us to catch and stop them.

      Reply
  23. Comment by Roger Peatman posted on

    Julia (DVSA) posted onon 05 September 2019

    "Hi Rob
    At this stage it is not mandatory for existing test stations to install connected equipment. Any discussions about making connected equipment mandatory for existing test stations are still to be held."

    So when are these discussions going to be held ? ?
    We need some idea of the timescale (unlike Brexit)

    Reply
    • Replies to Roger Peatman>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Roger
      Discussions are ongoing and it is dependent on when the equipment is made available by the manufacture and approved by the GEA.

      Reply
  24. Comment by Gary Lewis posted on

    At last MOT tester said can't test on rolling road did test with brake meter in vehicle on road test

    Reply
    • Replies to Gary Lewis>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Gary
      Digital decelerometers are available and we are working with manufactures to make them connectable.

      Reply
  25. Comment by Nigel posted on

    can you please clarify the following-
    If you want to apply for an existing VTSthat is currently testing, and you are a new company taking over that VTS will you need to upgrade the Brake rollers. or does it apply to new setup VTS's.

    Reply
    • Replies to Nigel>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Nigel
      The scenario you described will be a new application to operate an existing test station. As this is a new AE applying this will be viewed as a new application and it will have to comply with the new rules post 1 October.

      Reply
  26. Comment by Barry at CCM Garages posted on

    It's not going to be comfortable but those who survive in the mot trade, let alone the motor trade, are going to have to embrace technology and change as though it were the norm.

    The EODB dongle will stop fraudulent cars being registered, emissions and brake data may as well just be sent straight to DVSA so that we don't have to mess about with paper copies. Then if testers had managed to make a decent job of headlight alignment we wouldn't see the need for expensive connected beam setters .. for too long our industry has fallen short and now I think we will pay the price

    I see so many blog posts moaning about change that I wanted to perhaps give a different view;

    Vehicles and vehicle technology will evolve at an unprecedented rate over the coming years, as MOT test bays we will have to evolve or be left behind. As a garage and mot bay owner we are seeing all our techs now needing training for 10 % of their working year ( 2 -3 days per month ) , massive cost, less billable hours ...but we are looking at the future and investing accordingly. Our mot business will no doubt be the same as increased regulation and more training and equipment are needed.

    Only things that could help me are

    1. FIX THE MOT FEE

    2. INCREASE THE MOT FEE

    Then at least the charge out rate would be realistic and the increase would cover investment.

    Reply
    • Replies to Barry at CCM Garages>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Barry
      Thank you for your interesting observations. Jut a point to note - the MOT test fee is not decided by DVSA but Department for Transport.

      Reply
  27. Comment by BOB SAUNDERS posted on

    We have an AREX plate brake tester, how will this be affected? It can already link to Wi Fi but doesnt link to the MOT system.

    Reply
    • Replies to BOB SAUNDERS>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Bob
      Currently plate brake testers are not connectable. We have been speaking to manufactures of plate testers but because not many are sold, they are focussing on roller brakes testers. Plate testers will remain approved but not connected to MTS for now.

      Reply
  28. Comment by Matthew B posted on

    Excellent idea. If you are an honest MOT tester that’s great, it will help DVSA in their under funded battle against dishonest people. I like cameras everywhere, if you’re not doing anything wrong, why worry? I’m an honest person but I can’t compete with people that aren’t

    Reply
    • Replies to Matthew B>

      Comment by mark mitchell posted on

      i am with you matthew i want a camera in my station too prove that i am a honest tester there are a few station near me that are not and for a price a mot you get my drift so this can not come too soon for me if you honest there not a problem with a camera in your station

      Reply
    • Replies to Matthew B>

      Comment by Richard posted on

      Maybe it is a good idea.But are you happy to spend thousands of pounds just to prove that you test to the correct standards?DVSA should know who is or who is not testing correct standards with all the data available.

      Reply
      • Replies to Richard>

        Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

        Hi Richard
        As explained in the blog post, usually only a software upgrade will be needed to allow the equipment to connect to the MTS.

        Reply
  29. Comment by John posted on

    So if brake testers comes in this year when will beam testers and emissions testers be linked to the mot computer

    Reply
    • Replies to John>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi John
      As mentioned in previous comments it is dependant on the manufactures and when they are approved by the GEA, once we have a good spread of equipment approved we will announce when their use will be phased into the MOT.

      Reply
  30. Comment by Roy posted on

    DVSA are contemplating introducing cameras to the test bay to record number plates ? Under VOSA, testing stations were not allowed to use recording equipment on test bays, will we now be able to record testing at our own test sites, or is this a rule for one and not the other. By recording our own testing we can protect ourselves with evidence that testing is carried out correctly, further more when an appeal arises and an onsite visit from DVSA transpires testing stations would have a much greater level of protection in appeal situations. the cost of up dating equipment can not be calculated with any degree off accuracy but will certainly be extreme and will not eliminate the use of doner vehicles.
    The cost of installing recording software into a test bay would be a fraction of the upgrade costs and more reliable and give greater protection to the legitimate tester 48 years testing 1 11 111 1v v 7

    Reply
    • Replies to Roy>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Roy
      The ANPR cameras will record an image of the registration number and will not be recording video.

      Reply
  31. Comment by Andy Steele posted on

    Whats stopping putting a car with 100% brakes going on the roller test instead of the car being MOT'ed for dodgy dealers

    Reply
    • Replies to Andy Steele>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Andy
      You need to record both the VIN and the VRM to carry out the MOT test so this should not be happening. We have no control over testers that choose to flout the rules but we will deal with then appropriately when we know who they are.

      Reply
  32. Comment by Paul posted on

    You say it will save testers time using these new connected brake testers etc. But won't spending less time on a test affect a testers all important RAG rating?? Then as a result be getting more visits from yourselves.

    As far as stopping fraud as you put I put every Mot I do on the ramp & test it properly so I am all for anything that stops all the testers out there who don't. I do however thing having ANPR cameras in the workshop a little extreme!!

    Reply
    • Replies to Paul>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Paul
      Thank you for your comments. You will be spending less time as you won't be having to transfer results you've noted in the test to MTS when you've finished it. We've brought this in to help reduce the number of incorrectly entered results, as well as stopping incorrectly entered vehicle identification numbers (VINs) and mileage. More is in the blog post about this.

      Reply
  33. Comment by phil littlewood posted on

    DVSA have no idea of running a business, we looked at a site, and there was one testing station in the area, but not in a distance to tread on there toes, we went along nicely, doing about 10 tests per day, no were near capacity, YOU in you ignorance of business life have now allowed there to be five stations !!, you also moan about discounting the test fee, but one has reduced his fee by £10.00, so guess what, we are doing around 3 tests per day, now you come out with this idea, lets be honest, its the equipment manufactures who have put pressure on to sell equipment, dont deny it, i know someone in that industry who has told me the inside info. How do you expect us to afford to upgrade, this equipment, when you pull tricks like this,if you have to replace equipment, will you also have to bring your test lane up to date, as a lot of old ones dont meet the current dimensions? to fit new brake testes ,might not be possible as they may simply have no room. Why fix that is not broken, every thing that has been done since the new system has been put in place in worse than before, the latest mot guide is rubbish, its difficult to find your way around it, compared to the previous system, get more men on the ground to police test stations, if you do it right you have nothing to hide, regards

    Reply
    • Replies to phil littlewood>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Phil
      As mentioned in the blog we’re adopting a phased introduction for connected equipment and from the 1st of October existing test station will only need to install connected equipment if their current roller brake tester breaks down and can’t be repaired.

      Reply
  34. Comment by Tony Copley posted on

    I am a believer that if something is not broken do not fix it. More and more regulations & special notices are not making testing easier but are complicating things and seem to show a distrust of testing stations. The latest computer systems in place should make it easier to see the called dodgy stations.I have been a MOT tester since 1969 and not all changes are for the better.

    Reply
  35. Comment by Jon C posted on

    So am I in thinking by the end of 2020 all Standard MOT equipment will be linked to the vosa network with the possibility of ANPR cameras installed in the workplace MOT bay , who is to pay for all this extra cost also will the price of an MOT test go up' . Next we will be wearing cameras while we carry out the test!

    Reply
    • Replies to Jon C>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Jon
      As stated in the blog we’re adopting a phased introduction for connected equipment and from the 1st of October this will only apply to roller brake testers. We will introduce more equipment types as they become approved by the GEA. The blog also explained that much connected equipment will only need a software upgrade.

      Reply
  36. Comment by Bob posted on

    Julia (DVSA) obviously works for a government department. Generic answers and no idea of the financial implications for small or even medium companies...Typical response from the establishment...And its got nothing to do with streamlining MOT s...Big brother is definately keeping its eye on us...

    Reply
    • Replies to Bob>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Bob
      As mentioned in the blog, the introduction of connected equipment from the 1 October only applies to existing test stations if their current roller brake tester breaks down and can’t be repaired. There is no requirement for existing sites to upgrade.

      Reply
  37. Comment by Mp tester posted on

    I don’t know why everyone gets all uptight about modernising. Realistically how many cars less than 10 even 12 years old actually fail a brake test! And how many would fail if the decision is taken from the tester. Some of the fail criteria is still down to the tester to decide. I bet a lot of fast fit centre failure rate would decrease. I remember many people kicking off when automated test lanes came out and scales were used. No one had to go out and change old rollers then and many stations i know including us still have them now. A software upgrade during a calibration will probably not be the end of the world. As for the cameras and anpr that’s probably about cutting out the mistakes. If the time taken is reduced by up to five minutes a test that’s an opportunity to do an extra test a day. Possibly £250 per week more plus any extra that comes with it.

    Reply
  38. Comment by anthony marshall posted on

    How long before you do away with the N/T altogether?

    Reply
    • Replies to anthony marshall>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Anthony
      As all testers and mechanics know, cars have changed significantly since the MOT test was first introduced. Using connected equipment lays the foundations for DVSA to prepare for any future changes to vehicle testing.

      Reply
  39. Comment by Darren posted on

    say I want to put an mot on a car not present then surly only need to put its number plates on a car that is and go through the motions? If testers want to take the risk they will find a way. Garage owners like myself fear being struck off

    Reply
    • Replies to Darren>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Darren
      Using ANPR to identify the vehicle will help reduce the number of errors made by testers when a vehicle is registered for test. DVSA receives around 60 requests every week to correct errors where testers have recorded a test against the wrong vehicle. This not only put a drain on our resources resolving these but also affects car owners who have difficulties trying to sell their vehicle due to incorrect records in the test history.
      Unfortunately there will always be people who try to cheat the system and put the safety of other road users and pedestrians at risk.

      Reply
  40. Comment by Paul posted on

    OK, so we now have to plug into the EOBD port. What do we do when the system reads the ECU and comes up with a different vehicle to that being tested? Think it will never happen? ECUs get changed all the time on some vehicles as they are well known for going bang - Range Rover P38 for instance. It is the same ECU across the range as far as I am aware, both petrol and diesel, but when one goes phut and gets replaced with another from a scrapped vehicle it won't be updated with all the new chassis, body, engine, fuel type, axle and transmission numbers etc, nor the date of manufacture or any fault codes stored in the old unit.

    And how are we supposed to plug into an EOBD port on older vehicles, such as a Land Rover Series 3 for instance? Can you recommend a manufacturer who can provide such equipment?

    What size will the ANPR system attached to the decelerometer be, and where will we be plugging it into on the vehicle whilst it is being tested out on the road, away from the test station?

    Why not just admit that you are no longer willing or able to properly police the dodgy testers and are making the rest of us pay the price?

    Reply
    • Replies to Paul>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Paul
      As the blog states we are experimenting with EOBD and discussing ANPR camera usage. We are aware of the issue you mention with second hand ECUs being fitted to vehicles and will look at all scenarios before any final decisions are taken about introducing these into the test.

      Reply
  41. Comment by Steve race posted on

    Please put the anpr cameras in next week and let them be programmed so that the test cannot even be started if the number plates do not conform, that would save more time than all the other stuff.This would really bring it home to the gormless people that fit these "show plates" and think they are being picked on when we as testers fail them and then have to spend valuable time explaining why

    Reply
  42. Comment by Nigel posted on

    Hurrah, at last a decent suggestion from DVSA, a ANPR camera, simple solution to fraudulent testing, simple to link to the MTS, log on test of vehicle take picture and you know what is in the test bay. Best idea ever!
    However putting more costs on smaller mot stations for upgrading seems very unfair, this will undoubtly force more to consider is it worth carrying on.
    As previously said by a respond ant, the equipment companies will look at it as another quick money maker, why can't DVSA regulate them with their costs, example £800 plus to update analysers, the actual programme would have cost about £100 pounds or so as most were only a disc, which some of us had to do ourselves. Go for the camera!

    Reply
    • Replies to Nigel>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Nigel
      As well as preventing fraudulent tests, using ANPR to identify the vehicle will help reduce the number of errors made by testers when a vehicle is registered for test. DVSA receives around 60 requests every week to correct errors where testers have recorded a test against the wrong vehicle. This not only put a drain on our resources resolving these but also affects car owners who have difficulties trying to sell their vehicle due to incorrect records in the test history.

      DVSA doesn’t have powers to regulate costs charged by the equipment manufacturers. We suggest that any concerns you have are raised with your trade associations.

      Reply
  43. Comment by karl stevenson posted on

    ANPR cameras,all equipment connected to dvsa what next a robot to do the test. Big brother is coming to the garage trade. We have cameras all round our mot station but not for dvsa its for our peace of mind and safety and i suppose we can always check back if there was ever a problem and prove the test was done correctly.If a garage is reported for doing something wrong keep a close eye on them not garages who perform well and try to keep there standards very high.

    Reply
  44. Comment by Steve Mason posted on

    I think we might be saying good bye to a lot of good independent test stations due to the costs involved for replacing/upgrading equipment to meet new requirements after reaching the end of usable life of the equipment.

    Reply
    • Replies to Steve Mason>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Steve
      We’re using a phased approach starting with roller brake testers from 1 October 2019. At this point existing test stations will not need to replace equipment unless it breaks down and can’t be repaired. However most modern roller brake testers only need a software upgrade that could be done when the equipment is calibrated. Any decisions to make connected equipment mandatory will involve representations from MOT trade associations and consultants.

      Reply
      • Replies to Julia (DVSA)>

        Comment by Pete posted on

        Hi Julia
        I can't help thinking that your reply "At this stage" is rather telling.Any consultation on the matter will no doubt be dominated by vested interests such as manufacturers and service groups of such equipment and the bigger players in the testing business looking to increase their market share by culling the smaller operators who wouldn't be in a position to invest given their test numbers. It would also play well with yourselves at the DVSA as a smaller number of bigger sites would be easier to manage than the current 'cottage industry' the scheme largely is.

        Reply
        • Replies to Pete>

          Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

          Hi Pete
          We are fully aware that the majority of test stations are small businesses and this is not intended to drive anyone out of MOT testing. However, we need to make sure the MOT keeps pace with changes in vehicles and reduce fraud within the industry. We have been discussing this for some time with trade bodies and it was discussed at the MOT trade user group who were all very supportive of connected equipment.

          Reply
          • Replies to Julia (DVSA)>

            Comment by Pete posted on

            Hi Julia
            With respect, the trade user group is dominated by bigger players like the Deptford company and doesn't speak for thousands of smaller enterprises. I have no problem with the aims of this move but I think the DVSA should be more upfront about where they want the MOT scheme to be and by when? Small garages work on narrow margins and need to know how much investment is going to be needed going forward. Many got hit with the smoke meter update last year when it became mandatory, with some manufactures cynically saying their equipment couldn't be updated forcing many to buy new units, a similar scenario could be repeated if the plan is to make connected equipment mandatory . You could have a brake tester failure and have to buy a new approved unit at considerable cost only to find that at some unspecified future date the rest of your equipment needs replacing. In hindsight maybe you wouldn't have bought the brake tester and cut your losses and moved away from testing.

          • Replies to Pete>

            Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

            Hi Pete
            The MOT trade user group, TUG, has representation from trade bodies and consultants who voice concerns for all in the MOT industry. The MOT councils are predominantly made up of small to medium size garage owners, so we are consulting with a broad spectrum of the industry on connected equipment.

  45. Comment by mark mitchell posted on

    will us with older equipment be made too up grade our not most off the station in my area are 1 man bands if these changes are forced on us it will close us down myself included i have 10 years till i retire it would not be cost avective for me to replace emissions tester /brake tester /headlight tester i do like the idea off a npr camera in my place i would put my name down for 1 it shows the vosa that your not up too anything shady as we all it goes on

    Reply
    • Replies to mark mitchell>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Mark
      We’re using a phased approach starting with roller brake testers from 1 October 2019. At this point existing test stations will not need to replace equipment unless it breaks down and can’t be repaired. However most modern roller brake testers only need a software upgrade that could be done when the equipment is calibrated. Any decisions to make connected equipment mandatory will involve representations from MOT trade associations and consultants.

      Reply
      • Replies to Julia (DVSA)>

        Comment by Sam Thompson posted on

        How will test centres and vehicle examiners be able to carry out full inspections throughly on systems such as ADAS and fully autonomous vehicles in the future. Will there be compulsory equipment released from DVSA for test centres to purchase to inspect these vehicles. This will be a huge safety impact for the public and just as vitally important as inspecting the general items of theMOT.

        Reply
        • Replies to Sam Thompson>

          Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

          Hi Sam
          As yet there isn’t a simple piece of equipment that can be plugged in to test these systems. This is why we are keen to allow the MOT system to be connected to the vehicle via EOBD. This will hopefully path the way for us to work with vehicle manufacturers to enable us to test these safety critical systems during the MOT in the future. We want to future proof the MOT test.

          Reply
          • Replies to Julia (DVSA)>

            Comment by Sam Thompson posted on

            So will these autonomous vehicles still need an mot new after 3 years and every year after that? How does the law on these vehicles apply to the mot law

          • Replies to Sam Thompson>

            Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

            Hi Sam
            Autonomous vehicles will still require an MOT as they will fundamentally be mechanically similar to how they are today. The Department for Transport is carrying out in-depth work into this area. At this stage we do not foresee changes to the MOT frequency.

      • Replies to Julia (DVSA)>

        Comment by Bradley posted on

        So is the answer to the question that it is not going to be mandatory to upgrade or it is going to be when you see fit. (worker in a small independent garage)

        Reply
        • Replies to Bradley>

          Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

          Hi Bradley
          It will only be mandatory to update equipment as stated in the blog post when the current item breaks down or there are changes in the business entity that mean a new application for an AE is sent to DVSA.

          Reply
    • Replies to mark mitchell>

      Comment by M Ayres posted on

      Hello Julia.
      I hope Retro fitting a connectivity device to an old piece of equipment will not be the same fiasco we had with the Exhaust Gas analysers some years
      ago. We were forced to have our machine ready to accept a smart card, (Which we did at our expense ), only for it to be shelved because it was too problematic. No compensation was offered for this outlay.

      Reply
      • Replies to M Ayres>

        Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

        Hi there
        The trials we have done have worked well and we do not envisage any issues. We plan to continue rolling out connected equipment for garages to upgrade when they are ready.

        Reply
  46. Comment by Graham posted on

    Here we go again it still shows the lack of trust you perfect people have in your testers. The majority of us are honest and try to do a good job.

    Reply
  47. Comment by Mark posted on

    Don't need all this the system has worked ok for years and you will never catch the dodgy testers just pick on the legit ones

    Reply
  48. Comment by Mike Williams posted on

    Will the Connected Head lamp Aim tester check the initial alignment of the equipment. As an ex VE I would say this is one of the biggest problems. NT know how to align the tester but do not do it correctly, that’s if they bother to use it at all.

    Reply
    • Replies to Mike Williams>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Mike
      As acknowledged in the blog post, development is ongoing with headlamp alignment is still an issue and this is currently being investigated.

      Reply
  49. Comment by Garry Foster posted on

    Looking at the state of cars coming into the workshop that have just been Moted I believe you need to concentrate on getting boots on the ground. More inspectors and get back to your own training and not using outside 3rd parties as its not working.
    We've gone back 20 years in quality and its getting worse.

    Reply
  50. Comment by Dave posted on

    At what stage in the future will you be making it compulsory for garage's to replace their existing functional equipment with the "connected equipment" ?
    Who pays for the "upgrades" that some machines will require to make them compatible ? As we all know the manufacturers will use this as an excuse to make a killing and fleece the testing stations out of their hard earned money.
    Who pays for ANPR cameras to be installed ?
    Pretty sure I already know the answer !
    Hope you are also planning on increasing the test fee to a realistic level.

    Reply
    • Replies to Dave>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Dave
      We’re using a phased approach starting with roller brake testers from 1 October 2019. At this point existing test stations will not need to replace equipment unless it breaks down and can’t be repaired. However most modern roller brake testers only need a software upgrade that could be done when the equipment is calibrated. Any decisions to make connected equipment mandatory will involve representations from MOT trade associations and consultants.

      Reply
      • Replies to Julia (DVSA)>

        Comment by Peter posted on

        I really hope you're right about consultations! I bought a new gas/smoke tester around a year ago for the new diesel emissions limits and my brake rollers are in excellent condition but around 7 years old so I would guess not upgradeable to be connected. If I have to replace those two pieces of kit then I'll just close down. With no increase in the permitted test fee there is no future in it at my age.
        I can see this ending up with just Halfords and QuickFit doing tests.

        Reply
      • Replies to Julia (DVSA)>

        Comment by Dave posted on

        Hi Julia,
        Thanks for your reply, but you have pretty much avoided answering my questions.
        1: When will it be compulsory for garages to replace functional equipment for “connected equipment”.
        2: Who pays for the upgrades.
        3: Who will pay for ANPR to be installed.
        4: Are you planning on increasing the test fee.

        DVSA must have an idea of when they want these changes to take place and to say “discussions have still to take place with trade bodies” is side stepping the issue and not very helpful to garages who have to pay for these changes.

        Reply
        • Replies to Dave>

          Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

          Hi Dave
          We are still in discussion with the manufacturers over exact dates (except for RBTs). It will be the garages’ responsibility to purchase connected equipment but, as we explain in the blog post, not everything needs to be upgraded. Any upgrading that needs to be done will only be when equipment breaks down or a new garage is opening.

          Reply
  51. Comment by Peter Miles posted on

    I understood that some manufacturers were trying to phase out the EOBD 16 pin port in favour of their own manufacturer specific ones?

    Reply
    • Replies to Peter Miles>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Peter
      The socket is an EU standard so it would be strange if manufacturers could phase this out without agreement. We will look into this and obviously align our plans accordingly.

      Reply
    • Replies to Peter Miles>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Peter
      EOBD is mandatory for all petrol and diesel vehicle since 2008, any changes will need to be approved.

      Reply
  52. Comment by Alan Sutor posted on

    Are there currently any 'connected' roller brake testers that operate on a single phase electricity supply? Previous enquiries have shown a limited availability of single phase brake testers for class 4 vehicles and I fear that the manufacturers will be reluctant to supply them, effectively preventing any single phase only sites from either starting or continuing testing.

    Reply
  53. Comment by J R posted on

    Is the system going live from 1st october or is it just a requirement to have compliant equipment fitted from this date?

    Reply
    • Replies to J R>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi JR
      We already have some test stations using connected roller brake testers (RBT) however from 1st of October a connectable RBT must be installed at new test stations and when replacing a current RBT.

      Reply
  54. Comment by Gary Lewis posted on

    I was told 4x4 vehicles can't be tested on rolling road brake testers

    Reply
    • Replies to Gary Lewis>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Gary
      Some roller brake testers can test these vehicles, you need to check with the equipment manufacturer.

      Reply
    • Replies to Gary Lewis>

      Comment by bert posted on

      there are loads of 4x4 vehicles which are tested in the rolling road, and can't be tested any other way due to the electronic park brake

      Reply
      • Replies to bert>

        Comment by Gary Lewis posted on

        I can only state what the tester told me. He said I have to use brake meter in car to test the brakes, which he did.

        Reply
  55. Comment by Alan Houghton posted on

    I will be looking to retire at 65(July 2021).Do you consider it likely that this new equipment will become mandatory before this date as it would be obviously financially stupid for me to get the new equipment for such a short time

    Reply
    • Replies to Alan Houghton>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Alan
      Any discussions about making connected equipment mandatory for existing test stations are still to be held. However most modern equipment will only need a software upgrade to make it connectable.

      Reply
  56. Comment by matt posted on

    Sounds expensive for the smaller garages

    Reply
    • Replies to matt>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Matt
      At this stage it is not mandatory for existing test stations to install connected equipment. However, we advise that you ask your supplier if you current equipment can be upgraded.

      Reply
  57. Comment by Andy Yates posted on

    When will it be mandatory for us to install the equipment??

    Reply
    • Replies to Andy Yates>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Andy
      At this stage it is not mandatory for existing test stations to install connected equipment. However we advise that you ask your supplier if you current equipment can be upgraded.

      Reply
      • Replies to Julia (DVSA)>

        Comment by Mark posted on

        At this stage means soon

        Reply
        • Replies to Mark>

          Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

          Hi Mark
          As explained in the blog we're adopting a phased approach, starting with roller brake testers in October. They only need to be connectable if you need to buy a new one because your existing one has broken down.

          Reply
  58. Comment by lee posted on

    You talk about phased timing of introducing equipment, are you looking for all existing vts to introduce coms ready brake rollers for example. The article touches on new Vt's and upgrades to existing VTS's from october the 1st but garages like mine with older rollers (1978) in my case that meet the standard when I opened 5 years ago and have been more reliable than any new system that other garages constantly moan about breaking, would I need to give up these rollers in the coming years. For a small business like mine the notice of this is crucial in my planing of the business going forward as buying 10k rollers is a big challenge.

    Reply
    • Replies to lee>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Lee
      At this stage it is not mandatory for existing test stations to install connected equipment. Any discussions about making connected equipment mandatory for existing test stations are still to be held.

      Reply
  59. Comment by castrolrob posted on

    when does the vsi to test the above mentioned systems(adas etc)get provided?along with the vsi to test the stuff we are already trying to assess with little or no tech info?(think dpf presence/smoke limits/tpms sequences/srs etc etc)and what is the timescale for a full scheme rollout?the above appears to be little more than an ad for boston garage eqpmnt and its user.more details please.if its not becoming scheme wide applicable(and if our boss doesn't HAVE to buy new equipment he wont!)then its gonna be a matter of natural attrition which will likely take decades in some cases and is barely worthy of an independent blog subject given it merely reiterates the messages all testers and aes have already received.

    Reply
    • Replies to castrolrob>

      Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Rob
      At this stage it is not mandatory for existing test stations to install connected equipment. Any discussions about making connected equipment mandatory for existing test stations are still to be held.

      Reply
      • Replies to Julia (DVSA)>

        Comment by castrolrob posted on

        as above mentioned by others if it becomes mandatory it will be a,expensive and b,prohibitive and mainly for the small independants such as the one I work for.as I originally touched on are there ANY plans for it to be compulsory and if so on what timescale?and if that's not the plan why the blog.as originally said-more info please.still waiting to hear about the required tech info also.

        Reply
        • Replies to castrolrob>

          Comment by Julia (DVSA) posted on

          Hi
          There are no plans currently for all appropriate garage equipment to be connected to the MOT testing system. It only applies to equipment discussed in the blog post and, as explained, we’re phasing this in. We will let you know in due course – as you know we’re starting with roller brake testers. As also explained in the blog post, only the equipment specified will need to be able to connect to MTS when the original is broken or a new test centre opens or is taken over by a new AE where there is no continuity with the outgoing AE.

          Reply

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